Issue 3

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Theft by Finding Diaries (1977–2002)

By David Sedaris

For forty years, David Sedaris has kept a diary in which he records everything that captures his attention including overheard comments, salacious gossip, soap opera plot twists, and secrets confided by total strangers. Written with a sharp eye and ear for the bizarre, the beautiful, and the uncomfortable, and with a generosity of spirit, his newest book is a potent reminder that when you’re as perceptive and curious as Sedaris, there’s no such thing as a boring day.

Scribbled in the Dark: Poems

By Charles Simic

The Pulitzer Prize-winning former poet laureate’s signature sardonic sense of humor, piercing social insight, and haunting lyricism to diverse and richly imagined landscapes is on full display. Peopled by policemen, presidents, kids in Halloween masks, a fortune-teller, a fly on the wall of the poet’s kitchen; on crowded New York streets, on park benches, and under darkened skies: the poet toys with the end of the world and its infinity.

Reckless Daughter: A Portrait of Joni Mitchell

By David Yaffe 

Musician Joni Mitchell’s songs captivate people with the beauty of their language and the rawness of their emotions. Composed of dozens of in-person interviews with Mitchell, this intimate biography reveals the backstory behind the music—from her youth on the Canadian prairie, her pre-vaccine bout with polio at age nine, and her early marriage and the child she gave up for adoption, up through the quintessential albums and love affairs, and all the way to the present.

Between Them: Remembering My Parents

By Richard Ford

From Pulitzer Prize-winning author Richard Ford comes a deeply personal account of his parents and his changing perception of them while he also reflects on the impact of loss and devotion. Edna and Parker were rural Arkansans who married in 1928, and traveling throughout the South due to Parker’s travel salesman job until they had one child in 1944. For Ford, the questions of what his parents dreamed of and their parental love become a striking portrait of American life in the mid-century.

The Great Rescue: American Heroes, an Iconic Ship,
and the Race to Save Europe in WWI

By Peter Hernon

When the United States declared war in April 1917, the German luxury ocean liner SS Vaterland was interned in New York harbor. President Woodrow Wilson renamed it the USS Leviathan and it was converted into a warship that ferried US soldiers across the Atlantic Ocean. During the Great War, the ship played an important role, while under the constant threat of German U-Boats hunting Allied ships and the Spanish flu that was spread worldwide, striking healthy young adults including soldiers.

Chemistry:
A Novel

By Weike Wang

A luminous coming-of-age novel about a young scientist who must recalibrate her life when her academic career goes off track. After some soul-searching, the heroine learns the formulas and equations for a different kind of chemistry–one in which the reactions can’t be quantified, measured, and analyzed. The first literary work by Weike Wang astutely juxtaposes the elegance of science, the anxieties of finding a place in the world, and the sacrifices made for love and family.

Men Without Women

By Haruki Murakami

Across seven tales, with the same wry humor that has defined his entire body of work, Haruki Murakami brings his powers of observation to bear on the lives of men who, in their own ways, find themselves alone. Here are vanishing cats and smoky bars, lonely hearts and mysterious women, baseball and the Beatles, woven together to tell stories that speak to us all.

Magpie Murders: A Novel

By Anthony Horowitz

When editor Susan Ryeland is given the manuscript of Alan Conway’s latest mystery novel, she has no reason to think it will be much different from any of his others. But Alan’s latest tale has his protagonist investigating a murder, and the more Susan reads, the more she’s convinced that there is another story hidden in the pages of the manuscript: one of real-life jealousy, greed, ruthless ambition, and murder. This story-within-a-story thriller is a classic whodunit worthy of Agatha Christie.